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AMBASSADOR PROFILES

Meet our Ambassadors

Our Wildlife Ambassadors attend presentations and information booths for an experience you will never forget!
Each non-releasable Wildlife Ambassador has a story to tell about why they are not able to return to the wild and a lesson to teach about how we peacefully coexist with wildlife. From owls, hawks and falcons, to reptiles and amphibians - our presentations give you a chance to meet them up close!

Ash

Great Grey Owl

Ash was found as an orphaned fledgling, and became imprinted on her rescuers. Ash no longer recognizes herself as her own species, and identifies more with humans. Due to this, Ash can never be released.

Griffin

Great Horned Owl

Griffin was found as an orphaned fledgling and was kept with his rescuers for too long resulting in Griffin becoming imprinted on humans. Imprinting is an essential process that baby birds must undergo in order to recognize their own species, as a result Griffin can never be released.

Jet

American Crow

Jet was brought to Wildlife Haven as a juvenile with a broken wing. His rescuers kept Jet for two weeks before bringing him to us. In that time, the wing healed improperly and Jet became imprinted on humans.

Max

Great Horned Owl

Max was found as an orphaned fledgling on the side of the ditch. Parasites had begun to infect Max’s ears, which caused permanent hearing loss. Max’s compromised hearing would prevent him from finding prey in the wild.

Avro

Swainson's Hawk

Avro was hit by a car in Saskatoon, Saskatchewen. She had extensive damage to her right eye and unfortunately the eye had to be removed. Hawks rely on their excellent vision to hunt for prey, therefore with compromised vision Avro is unreleasable.

Milan

Mississippi Kite

Milan was brought to Wildlife Haven for rehabilitation from the Assiniboine Park Zoo. She had fallen out of her nest and attempts to reunite her with her parents were unsuccessful. Milan sustained a wing injury during her fall from the nest and can no longer fly properly.

Majestic

Bald Eagle

Majestic was brought to Wildlife Haven all the way from Reiny River, Ontario as a juvenile. She was dehydrated and starving and appeared to have an old fracture on her left wing. Majestic does not have full control of her flight feathers and therefore cannot be released back into the wild.

Chinook

Peregrine Falcon

Chinook was found in Morden, Manitoba suffering from a swollen and fractured left wing. Her injuries caused a large amount of calcification to her wrist and she no longer has proper control of her flight feathers.

Sitka

Bald Eagle

Sitka was found with her wing impaled on a tree as a juvenile in Langley, British Columbia. She sustained extensive damage to her left wing and is now unable to fly. Due to her wing injury, Sitka cannot be released.

R2

Red-Tailed Hawk

R2 was trained as a falconry bird. He was found tangled by his falconer’s equipment in a tree and could not free himself. R2’s owner had failed to report him missing and was therefore stripped of his falconry license. R2 is imprinted on humans and therefore cannot be released.

Widget

Northern Saw-whet Owl

Widget came to Wildlife Haven from another rehabilitation centre in British Columbia called OWL. She had a slight droop on her right wing from a previous injury that could not be fixed. Unfortunately her injury prevents Widget from being able to fly properly, rendering her unreleasable.

Winston

Eastern Screech Owl

Winston came to Wildlife Haven from the Assiniboine Park Zoo. He had made his way into their Snow Leopard enclosure and unfortunately sustained injuries to his right eye. Without the full use of his vision, Winston would be unable to hunt for his food.

Bruce

Western Hognose Snake

Bruce is a Western Hognose snake that came to our Centre in 2013. He was bought from a reptile distributor in the city, but the buyer was not made aware of By-laws that prohibit owning certain animals. Once aware the buyer surrendered Bruce to us.
Because Bruce came from the pet trade and we don’t know much about his background, he cannot be released.

Elliot

Eastern Box Turtle

Elliot came into our care in 2010 after being found walking up someone's driveway in Winnipeg. Even with the proper permits Elliot would not have been able to be released back into the wild because he may have been kept with other exotic animals and there is a risk of him transmitting non native diseases and viruses to the native wildlife.

Rico

Broad-winged Hawk

Rico was found in Peguis, Manitoba after being hit by a vehicle. Rico had extensive damage to his right eye which resulted in the loss of the eye. He sustained injuries to his wing which prevents him from extending it. Hawks rely on their vision and flight to hunt and capture their prey, due to Rico’s injuries he would not be able to survive.

George

Eastern Tiger Salamander

George is a male Eastern Tiger Salamander that was donated to our centre in 2011 as an adult for educational purposes. In 2009 his egg was collected for scientific research to determine the range and habit of Eastern Tiger Salamanders in Manitoba, and he became part of their educational programs. Since George has been part of educational programs and exposed to large amounts of human interactions for the majority of his life, he is non-releasable

Roo

Western Tiger Salamander

Roo is a male Barred Tiger Salamander that came to our center in 2014 as an adult after being surrendered to us by an individual at a breeders reptile show.
Because Roo was kept with other amphibians and reptiles (including exotics) there is a risk of him transmitting non-native bacteria and diseases to our native wildlife, therefore, he cannot be release.

Tigger

Western Tiger Salamander

Tigger is a female Barred Tiger Salamander that came to our centre in 2014 as an adult. Dropped off at the humane society after being kept as a pet for a year by an individual who decided they no longer wanted it
Since Tigger has been kept in captivity and we do not know what he has been exposed to he is non-releasable.

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Want to see our ambassadors in person?

View our event calendar to see where we will be next! 

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